Go Darke

Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it

Daily Journal, Humanism, Sociology

Abnormal behavior

Retirement is an unnatural act.

Perhaps more accurately it is the final act (before the curtains close) in a series of unnatural events that punctuate our modernity. In the extremely short period of time that the concept of retirement has been around it has managed to become so ingrained into our psyche that we don’t even consider that what we are doing is contrary to our biology or even just contrary to basic reasoning and logic.

Let me start my tirade with the industrial revolution. Arguably this is the time where things went both really right for us (as a species). And also really wrong. Although maybe we can just skip the evolutionary anthropology paragraph and just agree that we are not designed to wake up early, caffeinate ourselves to a point of bare minimum functionality, commute to a place (that we hate) where we sit all day in a cubicle farm, under artificial light, replying to email. After which we come home, expose ourselves to more artificial light, sleep for six hours and then repeat the entire process… For forty five years.

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We are essentially large hairless primates. Primates that can cooperate effectively to get stuff done, but basically we are still monkeys. In the wild primates live in large family groups, as did Homo Sapiens, until very recently (on the universal time scale). In fact imagine for a moment that we lived now as we had evolved to. As opposed to all the craziness we have foisted on ourselves. What would that look like?

As a social mammal I would have grown up in a large communal home with my grandparents, my parents and all my siblings. Lets just pretend it’s always worked like this. (in my utopian analogy there are strong property rights and everyone believes in Libertarianism, ha ha) Because our family has never moved, that land belongs to us ergo we have managed to harness potentially the biggest factor in financial independence, inter generational wealth. We pool our resources and share assets like communal appliances and cook communal meals. In fact because there is no food scarcity in our modern world (ie we don’t have to grow our own food or hunt for it), the savings associated with living in community and the level of technology available to us we find that we would hardly have to work at all.

This is obviously in direct opposition to the way we live now. We can’t wait to move out  and get indebted buying our own home. (after getting indebted getting a usually completely useless degree so we can get our awesome cubicle job) Then we have to repurchase everything we had had while we lived with our parents, and then have to work like crazy to afford all this new stuff. If we are considered savvy we save and invest our money so that we can afford to ‘retire’ in our twilight years before spending our final chapter surrounded by strangers in some palliative care facility that our kids have picked out for us on Google. (likely the first or second entry, after all who has the time to scroll anymore)

Not only do we see nothing wrong with living like this, we embrace it. We endeavour to  become a valuable commodity to those who want to sell us pension plans and tiny homes in sleepy sea-side towns.

In a tribal culture you don’t move out. When you procreate your tribe helps to raise your children. When you get old you don’t get sent off to a ‘home’ to die quietly, you live out your life surrounded by your family and the people you love.

OMG. I hate my parents. They drive me mad. And you’re suggesting I live in close proximity to them… forever?

And, I suppose, therein lies the rub.

On the one hand we are encouraged towards independence, we fight for control, seek out power and dominion over others… all the things that make habitat cohabitation socially challenging.  Yet until recently this is how we lived. In some cultures it’s still how people live. It’s just my Western culture seems to have forgotten how to live this way. We perpetuate a broken system that splits up our family’s, destroys our social bonds and makes us poorer, both in monetary terms and in quality of life.  It makes no sense.

I think the misconception is that only new age hippy families live like this. Or poor people. And that you either have to live in a teepee in the woods next to a rusted out Buick or in single room corrugated shack in a shanty. The truth is with modern architecture we can design dwellings that make communal living a breeze. We’d have more money, more free time and likely lead better, more social lives with better mental health.

Probably.

I think we might already be too far gone. Become too self involved. We have taken our biggest asset as a species, our ability to communicate and cooperate and made it redundant. Imagine the possibilities if we worked together like we were meant to instead of trying to do everything on our own. I think that would be quite something.

6 Comments

  1. tara caribou

    April 12, 2019 at 7:31 pm

    I love communal living. It definitely has a lot of pros. The young and elderly in such places all have their ‘jobs’ to SUPPORT the family as a whole rather than being a burden (as tends to happen nowadays). I am STRONGLY in favor of communal living. Don’t get me started lol

    1. Jo

      April 12, 2019 at 8:00 pm

      I really think it’s a great idea. I wish it were less frown upon!

  2. jim-

    April 13, 2019 at 2:43 am

    The sheer advantage of brainpower and longer than average lifespan has come at a cost—we are a complicated and sickly species fighting uphill from the time we are born until the time we die.
It’s a long life with this untoward genetic disposition. There are few things I would trade for a shorter life span, but shorter is sometimes better.
    The idea of palliative care and retiring are two things I would trade for a shorter life. Btw, I knew some folks up my way that lived communal. The news always reported them as weirdos and creeps, but everyone of them I met was well adjusted, loving and decent. I think we’ve forgotten how to live…and to love.

    1. Jo

      April 13, 2019 at 8:56 am

      I agree. I think as we advance as a species we will only live longer and longer, putting more and more pressure on our resources (natural and things like availability of jobs) as well as increased pressure on our social bonds and systems.

      I think the future (especially for the next generation) will be exceptionally challenging.

  3. SnapDragon X.

    April 14, 2019 at 1:13 am

    “Many long for immortality, yet don’t know what to do with themselves on a rainy afternoon.”

    1. Jo

      April 14, 2019 at 3:14 am

      I agree whole heartedly. We’ve never (as a species) had more ‘stuff’ available to us to while away the hours… yet suffer from boredom and apathy to everything around us. Its a strange dichotomy many (including me I suppose sometimes) have.

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